11 Types Of Negative Thinking You Seriously Need To Kill Today

Published by Paul Martin Harrison on

Did you know: there are some types of negative thinking that will massively effect your health?

These types of negative thinking can cause depress, anxiety, stress and just basically make you rottenly unhappy.  

Thousands of THE DAILY MEDITATION’s readers have successfully used our guide to stop negative thoughts

And if you haven’t yet, well, the time is now. 

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Why Some Types Of Negative Thoughts Kill Your Spirit So Bad

Some types of negative thoughts have absolutely disastrous effects.

As Margarita Tartovsky, M.S., says: “Negative thoughts can sink our mood and perpetuate a sense of helplessness and hopelessness. They can lead to everything from lost opportunities to depression.”

One of the best ways to stop stress is to stop these specific types of negative thoughts

So what are they? 

 

Types of negative thinking that add to depression, anxiety and other problems:

Monitor your self talk. If you notice yourself thinking and of the following types of negative thoughts try Mindfulness-Based CBT

1. All-or-Nothing Thinking.

“If I don’t do this I’ll be a complete failure.”

If you’re prone to this type of negative thinking you massively exaggerate the importance of something. 

Classic example: You say your life will be over if you fail an exam. 

One of the best strategies for this is to consider what will happen in the worst case scenario: yes, you fail the exam, but life continues anyway. #It’sJustNotThatBad

2. Disqualifying the Positives.

“Life is always bad.”

Oh boy. This is the most “emo” of all these types of negative thinking. You simply refuse to acknowledge anything good

This even happens in over privileged people. Some people have so much to be thankful for, but they’re just miserable anyway.

3. Negative Self-Labeling.

“I am a complete failure and I always will be.”

Do you think the worst about yourself? If so, you’re suffering from this kind of negativity. 

Self -labelling means obsessively thinking-up negative things about yourself, and saying that you are those things. 

For instance: 

“I’m a total loser”

“I’m a bad person”

“I’m fat”

“I’m a failure”

“I’m a fool”

“I’m an idiot”

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Even if the description is accurate (e.g. you think “I’m an alcoholic” when you truly are one) you can still think in more positive ways. 

4. Catastrophizing.

“This isn’t just going to be bad, it’s going to be the worst thing of all time.”

This is the type of negativity where one bad thing means game over, man, game over. 

5. Mind Reading.

“I know people like me because I can read their minds.”

It might sound really positive to be able to read people’s minds. But in truth, it’s delusional. And most people who think they know what others are thinking also think everyone dislikes them.

99% of the time this is you projecting your own thoughts onto someone else. 

 

6. Should Statements.

 “I should do this and they should do that.” .

Nobody should do anything. So called Should-Thinking is massively unhelpful because it takes a positive (I’d like to get in shape) and makes it seem obligatory (I should get in shape)

 Cut it out already. 

 

7. Excessive Need for Approval.

“I need you to need me.”

If you suffer from these types of negative thoughts you constantly think you need other people to like / love / approve of you. 

Newsflash: The only person who need to approve off you is you. 

 

8. Disqualifying the Present.

“Everything will be all right later.”

This one is a killer. In this type of negative thinking we accept that life sucks right now because it will get better. Problem is, this also prevents us from doing something about it right now.

 

9. Dwelling:

“I have to think about everything that’s wrong in my life.”

Oh boy. This is the style of negative thinking where you believe that to improve you have to focus full-on on everything that’s bad in your life. 

People who dwell on things always think about the bad, as though they are afraid that things will get worse if they lose sight of the bad things. 

 

10. Pessimism:

“That glass is clearly half empty.”

Pessimism is thinking the worst of a situation that is part good and part bad. 

However, just because pessimism is bad doesn’t necessarily mean realism or optimism are better. What’s best is balance (acknowledge the bad, the okay, and the good, at the same time).

 

11. And plain old feeling empty when things go wrong

 

 

The worst type of negative thoughts are automatic ones

Have you ever noticed that you have automatic negative thoughts? Examples include things you think over and over again, and thoughts you can’t get rid of. 

The majority of truly “Negative” thinking pertains to spontaneous negativity. It’s not logical or rational. It’s negative solely for the sake of being negative.

“Negative thoughts are automatic thoughts in response to uncertainty, anxiety, disappointment or other challenges,” says Tamar Chansky, Ph.D, a clinical psychologist (1).

Negativity often spontaneously manifests.

 

Example of spontaneous negative thoughts

You’re sitting in a bar when a perfectly reasonable stranger walks in and looks at you quite innocently, and then you suddenly and illogically decide that they don’t like you.

The thought’s not based on reality or even logic, it’s negativity for negativity’s sake.

Such thoughts are sometimes the result of a specific mental health problem.

  • Obsessive Compulsive Disorder leads to irrational obsessive thoughts, for instance.
  • Generalised anxiety disorder, meanwhile, creates irrational worries that are usually situational.
  • Panic Disorder often creates negative thinking about health or the inability to escape a certain situation.
  • Social anxiety creates irrational negative thoughts around other people.

 

How to handle all types of negative thoughts

So if you suffering from these kinds of negative thinking, what can you do about it?

The best strategy is to use these mindful-CBT exercises. 

 

Negative thinking is a killer. It’s time to stop it. 

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Paul Martin Harrison

Paul Harrison is a meditation teacher, author and journalist based in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Paul has helped thousands of people to discover their true potential. Don’t miss Paul’s inspirational and enlightening book Journey To The Buddha Within You.

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