Sharon Salzberg’s New Meditation Book & Real-World Mindfulness

New meditation book by Sharon Salzberg, Real Change: Mindfulness to Heal Ourselves and the World, will be released in September.

Sharon Salzberg is, without a doubt, one of the best meditation teachers in the world.

The New York Times bestselling author and Buddhist meditation teacher, Salzberg has been one of the leading voices in bringing meditation to the West (and personal inspiration to me, inspiring me to become a meditation teacher

Sharon began learning about meditation after taking an Asian philosophy course. She went to India to study meditation as a junior in college. One of her big motivations was to learn to use meditation to cultivate practical skill rather than just learning philosophy. She attended a 10-day meditation retreat and learned mindfulness and breath awareness, among other things, learning from Burmese-Indian Vipassanā teacher S.N Goenka.

More than 45 years ago, Sharon began her journey in bringing meditation to the West, along with other notables like Jon Kabat Zinn. What I, and many other people, love about Sharon is that she teaches meditation in such an easy to understand way. She’s the type of person that will get you up to speed with meditation even if you’ve never tried it before.

Her lovable character and brilliant mind have led her to sell more than 11 essential books about meditation and mindfulness, and she has helped hundred if not thousands of people from the Insight Meditation Society in Barre, MA, which she cofounded.

Sharon Salzberg’s new book, is called “Real Change: Mindfulness to Heal Ourselves and the World”


Sharon’s latest book is titled Real Change: Mindfulness to Heal Ourselves and the World, and will be released in September 2020.

Speaking to Dale Kushner on Psychology Today, Salzberg says that the inspiration for her new book was encountering “so many people who inspire me through their dedication to their work in the world, some of whom function in very tough situations.”

Sharon says that in 2020 its imperative to understand the Buddhist idea of oneness. “There is a deep realization that our lives are intertwined,” she says. “The corollary to this is that everyone counts, everyone matters.”

She also advocated for peaceful understanding and acceptance of one another. “Love is stronger than hate ,” she says. “This certainly echoes the Buddha, ‘hatred will never cease by hatred. It can only cease by love. This is an eternal law.’

Speaking of mindfulness, Salzberg says that it doesn’t have to include meditation. “There are countless ways to cultivate mindfulness. Life gives us many opportunities every day, really every hour. Meditation is a little like strength training—a dedicated period of immersion where your focus is on cultivating the different facets of mindfulness—awareness, balance, and connection. It then becomes easier to apply mindfulness in conversations, at work, commuting, whatever we might be doing.”

Here, Salzberg speaks of Dispositional, or Trait mindfulness, which is not a specific practice but rather the general idea of being mindful in the present moment (research published today reveals that there are indeed significant benefits of dispositional mindfulness).

Sharon Salzberg’s new meditation book, Real Change: Mindfulness to Heal Ourselves and the World, is out in September and currently available for pre-order on Amazon.


Paul Harrison

Paul Harrison is a qualified meditation teacher and writer with more than 15 years experience in meditation and mindfulness. He studied meditation in Oxford, UK, and Hamilton Ontario Canada, and earned his degree at Staffordshire University. Paul has helped thousands of people to discover their true potential through mindfulness, yoga and meditation. You can read his books on Amazon

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